sandman endless nights featured image

The Sandman: Endless Nights

Waiting on the Trade Podcast

Welcome back to Waiting on the Trade, a monthly comics book club for people who don’t have time for monthly comics!

In this episode, Pat indulges my proclivity for power ranking, as we discuss Neil Gaiman and his many, many artistic collaborators’ The Sandman: Endless Nights.

guardians of the galaxy ewing cabal vol 1 featured

Ewing and Cabal’s Guardians of the Galaxy Proves Cosmic Comics Can Have Character

Reviews

I can’t connect with most cosmic superhero comics. To me, the word “cosmic” is shorthand for visual bombast, overly-complex politics, and extended metaphors that writers and artists rely on in place of crafting compelling characters. That’s why, even with current-best-Marvel-writer Al Ewing attached, I wasn’t sure I was going to love the most recent volume of Guardians of the Galaxy.

However, Guardians 2020 is clever, touching, and most definitely a character piece – while still delivering the bombast and spectacle that cosmic comic fans desire.

geis vol 1 cover featured

Geis: A Matter of Life and Death

Waiting on the Trade Podcast

Welcome back to Waiting on the Trade, a monthly comics book club for people who don’t have time for monthly comics!

In this episode, guest host Callum Smith (repeatedly) gives the gift of great comics, as we discuss Alexis Deacon’s Geis: A Matter of Life and Death.

blue in green cover anand rk featured

Blue In Green Is a Beautiful, Haunting Reflection

Reviews

I have not written in months. Or rather, I have not written anything of much consequence. I’ve written for my day job, and I’ve posted here. But my personal work, the stories I must ply from my heart and mind, have largely sat untouched.

While reading Blue In Green, I figured out why I have not lately touched my personal work. It is because consequential work, work of the type I would like to produce, demands effort and sacrifice. It demands a level of commitment I cannot currently achieve. Hovering in a liminal state during perhaps the most liminal month of my most liminal year, it is taking most everything I have to continue being a partner, a friend, an employee, a son, and a brother. I cannot be a writer, too.

So I understood exactly how Erik Dieter felt when the pale man offered him a choice in New York City. Dieter simply wanted to cut through life’s bullshit, while he was still young and alive, and create something that felt real. Something that felt great.

It is ironic that, where Erik Dieter failed, Blue In Green succeeds. Ram V, Anand RK, John Pearson, Aditya Bidikar, and Tom Muller have created something great, while commenting on the very act of artistic creation.